Cardiac physiology

I wonder if physiology professors everywhere hack on about the same things: action potentials in muscle cells, both cardiac and skeletal, and the contents of the cell. So many things I’m more curious about, like the human genome and DNA, transcription, meiosis and mitosis, brain chemistry, kidney function, etc etc. But somehow it seems to me that the longest lessons always wind up being on action potentials, with their sodium and potassium channels, depolarization, and concentration and ion gradients. Maybe it’s just UofO and ESO. Maybe these are just the ones I understood the first time (thanks Grant and Greg!).

So let me explain it to you, to test my knowledge!

The heart has two types of muscle cells: autorhythmic and contractile. Autorhythmic cells control the electric signal that initiates the beat of your heart. Contractile cells cause the actual beat you feel, pumping blood through the body, and coordinate the timing. Both of these work in a never-ending cycle of depolarization and repolarization.

Hokay, so… in autorhythmic cells, like any cell, sodium is constantly being pumped out and potassium is constantly being pumped in by ion pumps that live in the membrane. They do this to Continue reading

Mitosis, Meiosis, and weird alien cells

First day of embryology today. I once participated in a Visceral Manipulation III (of V) class, and my teacher spent a lot of time going through the embryology, SO FASCINATING. (Consider yourself 1 cm high, standing between layers of tissue, and walk. What’s in front of you? Behind? What do you run into? Where can you go? etc.) So today I was expecting something similar. Well, actually that is a lie. Last week I was expecting something similar. Then my physiology professor told us not to. Because we are students of osteopathy, and because he is a professor of physiology, and because osteopaths primarily need Continue reading

Today’s Osteopathic Inspiration

“The challenge is not just about the work, and the delivery of what the patient wants. It’s how far can I stay present and open and aware throughout the treatment, a practice of being present and being available.”

I’ve taken this quote from Sue Turner, an osteopath and alumni of the ESO who has an interview posted onย http://1000yearsinterviews.com/sue_turner/turner.swf , a website I highly recommend for anyone in the field, interested becoming an osteopath, treating with an osteopath, or learning more about what it is and the philosophy behind it. In this interview Sue makes many references to heavyweights in the field, and parts of it get quite academic. But there are also parts that really resonate with my perspective of my role as a healthcare provider, the innate wisdom of the body, and some radical ways she visualizes her practice. Totally recommend this for my functional methods classmates, if you’re reading! :)

Quick look at ESO via The Independent

This article gives a general overview of my school, the European School of Osteopathy, as published in The Independent earlier this year. The photograph shows the administration building, which also houses the cafeteria, board room, library, and a classroom.

I took this photo of the school grounds on my way in just a couple of days ago. The red and white buildings straight ahead and to the right are all classrooms, offices, and student center. Lovely the way the light hits in the morning. I’m happy to spend so much time in such a beautiful place.

School

My program is great. Mostly I have teachers who really seem to love what they do, to have an investment in Osteopathy and what it is meant to be. They have differing perspectives and a variety of teaching styles, but for the most part they all sound really interested in the future of the profession and creating thinking practitioners who are individuals, practicing according to a strong set of personal values and beliefs, rather than a short list of dogma.

This is only the second week after all.

Soon we’ll get deep into theory, philosophy, and practicals. The parts we’ve touched on so far have given me a lot of hope though. This program appeals to me just as much now as it did in theory.

More updates soon, once I have a better idea of what we’re doing. Thanks for reading my blog. It makes me feel connected in a unique way that I cherish.